Tutorial: Automatically Promoting Your App on your Social Feeds

A guest posting credit to: Ngonidzashe Kaseke, Joyful FM Radio, South Africa

Most radio admins and producers are well versed with the automatic tweets by their broadcasting tools. Its really easy. I will explain according to Radionomy but steps are the same.
STEP 1. Connect your radio to your social accounts Twitter or Facebook.
STEP 2. Upload jingles or promos for your station to your broadcasting tool. They can be audio ads about the app, how people can download free and listen via your new app. Even instrumental fillers of say 2 minutes can do.
STEP 3. After filling the metadata – track title and artist info e.g App promo – Joyful FM, and cover art; make sure you add automatic tweet info that will be tweeted automatically to your Twitter account or posted to your Facebook radio page. Same as how you add your #NowPLAYING info. Use the social share buttons of your broadcasting tools to do this . Here are examples of the text you can use for automatic tweets every time the promo or jingle plays on your radio : “Download our free app from Appstore /iTunes, GooglePLAY and Blackberry World. Search for Joyful FM” “Listen from your iPhone/iPad/iPod touch! Download free app here > http://goo.gl/nwYHFA or http://bit.do/joyfulfmApp “Listen from your Android device. Download now our free Joyful FM app here > http://goo.gl/DekyLa “This is what your twitter followers or fb fans will see every time your promo/ jingle or instrumental plays. Just like your #NowPLAYING tags.
Tweet your plugs for your app automatically
Tweet your plugs for your app automatically
Saves you time and your followers will see lots of them a day and will end up clicking!
Tutorial: Automatically Promoting Your App on your Social Feeds

Announcing Partnership with iPluggers

iPluggers and Nobex Partners Announce a New Partnership

Santa Cruz, July 17, 2017 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Finding the right music for your station can be difficult and keeping it fresh can be even harder, so finding a service that keeps your Music Director updated with the latest releases would be amazing! Nobex Partners is teaming up with iPluggers – a digital promoter of new music – to make it easy for stations to keep their playlist fresh and packed with great new music from quality artists and labels. Stations with Nobex Partners apps will be able to take advantage of the huge iPluggers database of new high-quality releases available for airplay all from within their Partner Dashboard.

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Radio stations can sign up for an account with iPluggers free of charge and get tailored iPlugging updates featuring the station’s selected genres to get music with just the right feel for their programming. Not only do stations stay updated on the latest releases, they can also browse and download music from the extensive iPluggers database, which offers a wealth of music in over 200 sub genres. They have access to digital press kits for artists and labels, including artist information, videos, biography, and discography. Radio show makers who do interviews with artists can even request interviews through the platform.

“For Nobex, having stations get the most out of the platform is key. Being able to offer iPluggers’ service to our stations means making their experience even better. We’re thrilled to see this launch!” – Cait Watson, VP Marketing, Nobex Partners

“Here at iPluggers, we’re working on a daily basis to provide our worldwide network of stations with the best music from artists and labels around the globe. We are very excited about our collaboration with Nobex: their app is truly amazing and takes listening to the radio to the next level, and we’re looking forward to service their radio makers with great music for their playlist! ” – Marvin Kuijs, Founder & Head of A&R, iPluggers

ABOUT iPLUGGERS:

iPluggers is a worldwide digital radio promotion service. iPluggers promotes new high-quality releases to more than 30.000 radio stations worldwide (FM, AM, internet, digital, satellite, local and regional radio stations). Access to their large database is free for radio stations www.ipluggers.com

ABOUT NOBEX PARTNERS:

Nobex Partners powers a complete digital solution and custom apps for thousands of broadcasters and podcasters across the globe. It’s not just mobile – it’s a complete digital solution.www.NobexPartners.com

Announcing Partnership with iPluggers

How Push Notifications Boost Re-Engagement

I wanted to share a quick note with you about how effective Push Notifications are to re-engage listeners. For those of you wondering what push notifications are, it is a message that pops up on the home or lock screen of a mobile device. It doesn’t require the user to be in the app or using their device at the time it arrives. A push message looks much like an SMS text message and reach users who have installed your app on their device and granted permission to send push notifications.

​In a typical broadcast you can only reach listeners who are currently tuned in and listening to you. The power of push notifications is being able to connect with listeners who are not tuned in and encouraging them to launch the app and rejoin your broadcast.

Push Increase
Station introduced push in late March saw a dramatic increase in streaming minutes
Daily Usage
Each point represents a push message and the spike of usage after it is sent.

 

Schedule push messages to keep you listeners engaged, have your DJs and hosts send them in realtime, keep listeners coming back all the time.

There are some best practices to consider when sending push notifications

  1. Push Messages are Not Email:
    Messages should be brief and concise. Keep in mind most users will see them flick across the top of their screen and may or may not read past the first line
  2. Timing:
    Since push messages are delivered instantly (or immediately as scheduled) be aware of your timing. A few minutes before the start of a new show, or before a hot new track comes up in your program.
  3. Language:
    Encourage an action, create a sense of immediacy to get the best reactions.

The Push Notification feature is available to all stations on the Plus and Pro level plans. Visit the Account tab in the Partner Dashboard to subscribe.

How Push Notifications Boost Re-Engagement

Radio Tel Aviv Just Powered The Biggest Headphones Party Ever with Their Nobex Partners App!

All through the night June 27th, Tel Aviv celebrated one of their biggest cultural events of the year, the White Night Festival. A celebration of their UNESCO designation as the White City.

Our Partner station Radio Tel Aviv hosted a fabulous event called the Headphones Party powered by their custom app from Nobex Partners. 30,000 event attendees listened on their headphones and danced through the night to great music available only through the app making it the largest ever silent disco!

 

“Top DJ’s lead the party from 20:00 till the middle of the night, in complete silence (the square is in the middle of residential part of Tel Aviv). Amazing scene!” – Roy Katz, Radio Tel Aviv

The app saw more than 40x the number of daily downloads, 5x streaming minutes, and 7x streaming sessions for the event.

 

 

 

 

Radio Tel Aviv Just Powered The Biggest Headphones Party Ever with Their Nobex Partners App!

Nobex Partners announces .113FM Radio Partnership

Santa Cruz, June 19, 2017 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nobex Partners is proud to announce our partnership with global online radio network .113FM Radio with the recent release of their custom app through the Nobex Partners digital platform. The app provides .113FM Radio listeners with the most complete and immersive station experience.

“We couldn’t be happier when we reached out to Nobex Partners to help us build a multi-station radio app for us. The team at Nobex Partners have been like family, working together seamlessly to build an intuitive app that our end listeners can navigate with ease. The social media integration is epic and gives us valuable feedback which otherwise may lead to missed opportunities. We’ve seen a steady increase by our listeners using our mobile app vs. our web site’s radio player too. Our multi-station mobile app is now home to over 35+ of our most popular radio stations and offers advanced features like song requests, birthday shout-outs, and comments which allow our listeners to easily communicate with us.”

— Stephen Herold | President .113FM Radio Network LLC.

“We got introduced to .113 FM through our partnership with SHOUTcast. It was a true pleasure working with Stephen on launching both single-station apps for his top stations, as well as a multi-station app for his whole network. Stephen keeps using the most advanced features the platform offers, and partners like him help drive us to keep developing and improving all the time.”

— Gadi Mazor, CEO Nobex Technologies

Listener Testimonials

“The Greatest thing I’ve ever downloaded, plus the DJ’s are always amazing!!” — by KimmieKayy

“Great music in a very intuitive and easy to use mobile app!” — by Vinnie Demafeliz

“Amazing” — hane T

“Amazing app Loved it” — Eduardo Mendoza

.113FM App – homepage, station selection, station customization, Request feature

ABOUT .113FM

.113FM Radio is a global online radio network, broadcasting a variety of Internet radio channels covering various music genres, time period and styles over the SHOUTcast and IceCast radio network.

Offering best in class content on each channel, .113FM Radio has over 100+ stations and has become one of the most listened online radio networks globally with an extensive reach to listeners in Europe, Latin America, Asia and the United States of America. You’ll find .113FM Radio Network on the web at http://www.113.fm.

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ABOUT Nobex Partners:

Nobex Partners powers a complete digital solution and custom apps for thousands of broadcasters and podcasters across the globe. It’s not just mobile – it’s a complete digital solution. www.NobexPartners.com

Nobex Partners announces .113FM Radio Partnership

Nobex Partners announces custom apps for Podcasters

Santa Cruz, June 6, 2017 – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Nobex Partners, the world’s leading platform for mobile applications for radio stations, serving over 4,500 radio stations in over 100 countries, now expands to offer apps to podcast creators. The Podcasting market is taking off and Nobex Partners is now providing custom branded apps and a full digital platform to help podcasters engage with their listeners, attract them back in, and create an on-going, branded dialog with their audience.

The apps are white-labeled for each podcaster and not only include the podcast episodes, but also any social feed the podcaster wishes to share with the audience – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, etc..

With over 70% of podcast listeners using their smartphone or tablet to listen, having a custom app is a must for any podcaster, but the app is just part of the solution from Nobex Partners. Launching a custom, branded app opens up a complete digital solution including re-engagement tools, audience interaction, and insights into listeners and their behaviours, and new monetization channels. The platform is powered by a backend portal open to the podcaster, that enables pushing messages to the audience (immediate, scheduled, or deep linked to a given episode); provides real-time insights on users’ engagement with the content; includes high-paying visual mobile ads through Nobex Partners’ master channel distribution agreement with Google’s Admob and with Facebook Audience Network; includes interactive forms that can be designed and modified at any time by the podcasters for further engagement with the listeners, and much more.

Podcasts are primarily distributed now through aggregator podcast applications. Content discovery in these platform is limited, and once the listener tunes into a specific podcast, they can easily move away to listen to other content. If the listener is using a branded app, the podcaster can create and maintain an ongoing dialog with the listener – sharing not just the podcast but any other content that would otherwise be only on the website – and drive the listeners back to the podcast through push messages, sweepstakes, quizzes, etc. Major podcasters devoted time and resources to create their branded apps. This is a costly process, which Nobex Partners now provides for free for any podcaster.

The Nobex apps are compatible with all leading podcast management and distribution platforms. Specifically, Nobex is working closely with San Francisco-based ART19 to seamlessly integrate the two platforms and provide a complete solution to the podcaster.

The platform is now open for any podcaster to play with and to create test applications. Initially, only podcasters willing and selected to participate in the beta program will be launched into the app stores. Full roll out will begin in July.

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“It was perfect timing when Nobex was introduced to me. We haven’t had the best luck with app developers, but Nobex has exceeded our expectations. Since launching The Rob, Anybody & Dawn Show with Nobex, we have seen a dramatic increase in our streaming traffic and the quality is outstanding.

The listeners are extremely happy with all of the features and ease of use of the Nobex product, along with the partnership of ART19. We now have seamless integration between live streaming and podcasting!”

Brandon Angel from RAD Radio Show – http://www.radradio.com/rad-radio

 

 

About Nobex Partners: Nobex Partners powers a complete digital solution and custom apps for thousands of broadcasters and podcasters across the globe. It’s not just mobile – it’s a complete digital solution. www.NobexPartners.com

Nobex Partners announces custom apps for Podcasters

The Early Days of Station Streaming

By Sean Ross

I can make no claims to being a digital native, but I did figure out this morning that I’ve been streaming broadcast radio for more than half of my adult life. It was almost exactly twenty years ago, early June 1997, that streaming became the primary way that I listened to the radio.

At that point, streaming had finally burgeoned past a handful of early experiments (going back to late 1994). The previous year, I’d gone to a friend’s place and he’d proudly shown me that he could stream Capital FM London. It sputtered. It buffered. It was listenable for about one song. (This one.)

I can’t remember why it took me another six months, but when I did start streaming Capital FM for myself, they became my P1 radio station within days, wresting me away from WHTZ (Z100) New York. And since Z100 was pretty terrific in summer 1997—during the full flower of CHR’s comeback, and its own—that took some doing.

I often joke that streaming allowed me to get married. When I met my wife in October 1997, she never had to know that my idea of fun used to be going on radio road trips; she may have figured it out though, because when we did drive somewhere with the radio playing, she had to get used to talking during the music, not the jock break, the opposite of what most people would have done. But to my friend who used to have to tape the BBC Radio 1 countdown for me in the early ‘90s, shhhh!

Streaming didn’t eliminate the need for the radio road trip, or “listen lines” (hearing a station over the phone on the private number given to consultants and group heads) right away. For the first few years, the stations that were available were the novelties, not the rule. Streaming was only starting to reach ubiquity in the early ‘00s when AFTRA royalty issues forced some stations offline again for several more years.

So at that point, one listened to what was available—not to a fantasy dial of all of one’s favorites. There were usually a few stations playing contemporary music from any given country, and not always from the obvious markets. The other choices for the U.K. were Key 103 Manchester, which quickly became a favorite, and Broadlands 102 (now Heart FM Norwich). The best choice for Sweden was Hit FM Malmo (now Mix Megapol). Some were as focused as American CHRs, but the European model of broad-based Hot ACs with lots of odd oldies was still prevalent at the time (and hasn’t entirely disappeared today).

The same randomness applied to who was available in North America. CKZZ (Z95.3) Vancouver was the first station that gave me my long-desired regular access to Canadian radio, and a monster CHR at that time. I don’t remember as much about who was available from the U.S., but I did end up listening to KBCQ Roswell, N.M., because it was there. The domestic station that I remember streaming most, a year later, was Country KPLX Dallas, when it became The Wolf, effectively becoming my New York Country station, since none could be received at my Billboard desk in Times Square.

Just because a station was streaming, you couldn’t count on actually hearing it. The player might not launch. The stream might not launch. The stream would appear to launch, but only silence was heard. Streaming should have been a conversation piece with co-workers, but usually the buffering was so bad I had to turn stations down when colleagues came in the office. One co-worker remembers me gesturing to the player, as if to a toddler, and saying “c’mon . . .  buffer for daddy!”

Five years before the advent of iTunes, the problems were worse if you were on a Mac. Stations tended to design their streaming player for Windows first. (It was often the Windows Media Player on which they were streaming.) The Mac version was done last, and sometimes would get done right before a station upgraded its Windows player, rendering the Mac version unusable within weeks or days of its launch. I remember somebody in charge of station streaming explaining to me, also as if to a toddler, that nobody was on Macs, as I tried in vain to explain that my entire industry already was.

Being able to stream the world made me seem particularly prescient about music. Not every European hit would surface here, but you only needed one “Torn” by Natalie Imbruglia for the early warning system to make you look smart. I learned to tune into NRJ Berlin’s afternoon countdown (at 9 a.m. my time) after “Mambo No. 5” by Lou Bega was pushed out of No. 1 by “Blue” by Eiffel 65, thus giving me two great tips for my American A&R friends in a row.

The challenge, of course, was trying to figure out what those songs were, especially those not in English, in the days before most players listed title and artist. In the pre-Shazam era, trying to identify a song still meant a call to a busy station request line, or to a crotchety station receptionist who immediately wanted to shunt you off to a busy station request line. I finally figured out a song I heard on Rix FM years later by humming it for a Swedish consultant in the lobby of the NAB Radio Show.

I can disclose this level of geekery now because streaming radio (broadcast or online only) has become a mass-appeal activity, despite roadblocks old and new.The first few years of streaming were beset by multiple problems, but not by those stopset substitution challenges that arose in the mid-‘00s, issues that many American stations have yet to fully work through more than a decade later. That doesn’t mean that streaming was a better experience back then. For years, it was strictly for the determined. But it doesn’t mean that stations can stop striving now.

The Early Days of Station Streaming